One hundred men will test today but only three win the Green Beret.
 

Sergeant First Class Eugene Ashley, Jr. Hall of Heroes.

Sergeant First Class Eugene Ashley, Jr. was born in Wilmington North Carolina on 12 October 1931. Not long a er his birth, his family moved to New York City where Ashley attended Alexander Hamilton High School. Ashley joined the Army from New York City in 1950 and served in the Korean War with the 187th Regimental Combat Team. 

Joining Special Forces, SFC Eugene Ashley Jr. was assigned to Company C, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Prior to volunteering for Special Forces, he had been assigned in a variety of positions including infantryman, ambulance driver, anti- aircra ammunition handler, and specialist in heavy weapons and parachute repair. He served as a cavalry and an armored battle group squad leaders and company sergeant with an airborne battalion. 

e Lang Vei Special Forces camp, located in the northwestern corner of South Vietnam a mile and a half from the Laotian border, was established in late December 1966 as a result of the Special Forces Detachment A-101 having been displaced out of Khe Sanh by the arrival of Marines. roughout 1967 and into the beginning of 1968, Lang Vei
and the surrounding area was constantly battered by North Vietnamese and Viet Cong artillery re. e camp’s population was swelled, holding 24 Special Forces as well as 14 South Vietnamese military, 161 man Mobile Strike Force commanded by Lieutenant Paul Longgrear, 282 CIDG (Bru Montagnards and Vietnamese) members, 6 interpreters and 520 Laotian military and civilians belonging to the 33rd Laotian Volunteer Battalion who had streamed across the border. Shortly a er midnight on February 7, 1968, a combined NVA infantry-tank assault drove into Lang Vei. Although the team radioed for help,
they could not convince anyone in Khe Sanh, the Marine base nearby that tanks were indeed “in the wire.” is was the rst use of tanks by the North Vietnamese in the war. Additionally, the Laotians refused to participate in the defense of the camp until a er daybreak. 

SFC Eugene Ashley, Jr., a Special Forces intelligence sergeant in Khe Sanh, volunteered to help relieve the camp. Assisted by two assistant medical specialists, their rst assault failed when a NVA machine gun crew opened re on them. Ashley, however, was not deterred, leading ve aggressive assaults to free the camp. Joined by SFC William T. Craig and SSG Tiroch who escaped from the Lang Vei, as well as others who were eeing from the surrounding area, he began counter attacks, supporting the camp with high explosives and illumination mortar rounds. Between the second, third and fourth assaults, Ashley directed airstrikes on the NVA defensive line and his own position. Simultaneously, he continued to direct the other Special Forces soldiers and Montagnards for yet another attempt. On this h counterattack, Ashley was mortally wounded only thirty yards from the command bunker. Without this steadfast commitment to ght to rescue his fellow Special Forces comrades, it is agreed, there would have been no survivors. 

When comrades were asked to describe Ashley, they responded that he was “a professional noncommissioned o cer who took care of his troops and exuded a fatherly image.” 

His family received the Medal of Honor posthumously. In 2001, the Eugene Ashley Jr. High School, located south of Wilmington near Carolina Beach was dedicated in his honor. 

His official Medal of Honor citation reads:

SFC Ashley, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Detachment A-101, Company C. SFC Ashley was the senior Special Forces Advisor of a hastily organized assault force whose mission was to rescue entrapped U.S. Special Forces advisors at Camp Lang Vei. During the initial attack on the Special Forces camp by North Vietnamese army forces, SFC Ashley supported the camp with high explosive and illumination mortar rounds. When communications were lost with the main camp, he assumed the additional responsibility of directing air strikes and artillery support. SFC Ashley organized and equipped a small assault force composed of local friendly personnel. During the ensuing battle, SFC Ashley led a total of 5 vigorous assaults against the enemy, continuously exposing himself to a voluminous hail of enemy grenades, machine gun and automatic weapons fire. Throughout these assaults, he was plagued by numerous booby-trapped satchel charges in all bunkers on his avenue of approach. During his fifth and final assault, he adjusted air strikes nearly on top of his assault element, forcing the enemy to withdraw and resulting in friendly control of the summit of the hill. While exposing himself to intense enemy fire, he was seriously wounded by machine gun fire but continued his mission without regard for his personal safety. After the fifth assault he lost consciousness and was carried from the summit by his comrades only to suffer a fatal wound when an enemy artillery round landed in the area. SFC Ashley displayed extraordinary heroism in risking his life in an attempt to save the lives of his entrapped comrades and commanding officer. His total disregard for his personal safety while exposed to enemy observation and automatic weapons fire was an inspiration to all men committed to the assault. The resolute valor with which he led 5 gallant charges placed critical diversionary pressure on the attacking enemy and his valiant efforts carved a channel in the overpowering enemy forces and weapons positions through which the survivors of Camp Lang Vei eventually escaped to freedom. SFC Ashley's bravery at the cost of his life was in the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

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We are former and current Green Berets who find and investigate those who falsely claim to be a Green Beret. We will never out someone unless we are 100% certain via FOIA and Bragg.

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Recent comments

Johnny O:

Ol' "Sarge" here talking all kinds of crap and stuff after he was exposed...LOL

Johnny O:

It's really pathetic that people try to get away with this type of stuff. I spent 23 years in the Army and retired in 2006 and although would have loved to to be a part of a Special Forces or Ranger unit and go through all of the training, never did it. And it just amazes me the lengths that people will go through to embellish military service.

Jacob Martin:

Question: There's a photo of him with two "fatboys" wearing berets, are either of them actually SF? The one in the middle sure doesn't wear his beret correctly (might be an officer)! lol

LoriKat:

Impressive bio. Rambo, Ralph Macchio (Karate Kid) and Chuck Norris all rolled into one. They have a song named for him "Superman, Where Are You Now".

LoriKat:

I don't know much about a military uniform BUT his pants are WAY too long...they bunch up on tops of his shoes and basically drag the ground in the back. Also, there was a pic of him with a lady...outside...without a cover. Hmm.

Guest:

Someone collected this man's entire saga here: https://jeremydewittecase.com/

Warning: you'll spend hours on this website.

Brother Of Brian Magyar:

9 June 2020

Ya' know, instead of considering why someone does what he does, like assholes, ya' jump to foul comments about someone ya' never met, or know anything about ….

I'd call our parents white trash, but that would be an insult to white trash ….

Brain went into the United States Army after July 1975, after I went into the United States Navy in that July ….

We both got out of Boot in September of 75' ….

That was the last I ever saw of him ????

Neither of us wanted to go into the Military, but we were kicked out he house by our mother, to call her a mother is also an insult to all mothers ....

If you ever saw the movie " Mommy Dearest " , then ya' might have some idea what our childhood was like ….

The only thing that put the smile on our mother's face was when she was beating the living shit out of her boys, buckle end first ….

In the late sixties, early seventies, Brian and I never did drugs, alcohol, or commit any crimes ….

As a kid, Brian always wanted to be part of a group, gang, whatever ….

I loved karate, so I walked the path of bushido, honor and face above all ….

Always a team player, but still a loner ….

People tell me I'm a veteran, but I'm quick to say that in my eight years in the United States Navy, ( 1975-1979 active, - 1983 reserve ),

I never carried a gun, or, was ever in any danger ….

Most of it on sea duty, all fun and games, and going over seas, but, after all, sailors belong at sea ….

Just as I was getting off active duty, I made Second Class Petty Officer, IC-2, N.E.C. ( M.O.S.) 4713, telecommunications,,,,

telephone man ….

Honorably discharged, I display that along with my DD-214

I'm now sixty-three, and retiring from the telephone company ….

So,,, no comments about me ….

It's been forty-five years now ….

Brian is my younger brother, but I understand him just the same …..

Kind'a like a car salesman, he always needed that affirmation from others ….

He still needs what he never got from our mother,,,, to be loved, appreciated, admired, respected ….

As a kid, he loved the song " Ballard of the Green Berets " ….

He wasn't stealing glory, but imitating that which he admired the most in the United States Army,,,, the Green Berets ….

When I read the comments about Brain, as I suspect, real Green Berets, and other Army Special Forces,,,, are much like United States Marines, United States Navy Seals, and now Antifa protesters ….

And I met a few Marines and Seals ( claiming ) during my time in the Navy ….

They are only really tough when the other guy can't fight back, shit-for-brains bullies ….

My proof, Viet Nam, Granada, Fallujah, Pakistan ….

As far as I know, you tough guys never faced real Soviet, Chinese, Iranian, or any other real Special Forces on equal footing ….

Hell, the real Rambo's in Viet Nam was the Viet Cong …..

And they kicked the ( bull ) shit out of you smart mouth's ….

When I was aboard ship, the only time I found our who went to Viet Nam was during dress inspections, when they wore their ribbons on their chest ….

They never talked about it, I assume it was the most horrifying times of their lives ….

Had Brian had good parents, good home, good schooling, a good life, I have no doubt he would have proudly earned the ribbons on his chest ….

In the United States Navy, I only earned an overseas service ribbon, and a good conduct ribbon, which I never wore, but are now on my old Navy uniform for when I pass away ….

Brian is, and always will be my brother, we suffered too much together as kids, and I appreciate the fact he is imitating the best the United States Army had to offer,,, in his time ….

And if you can't appreciate his admiration of the Green Berets, YA' can kiss my Navy Blue ass ….

Jory Jory:

I don't know what to say. He is such a silver tongue devil. He slid into our lives and we fell for his line of BS. This was back in the late 80's/early 90's. Met him in a local biker bar, he was a musician. I said, Thank you and welcome home. I lent him $$. I introduced him to a friend and that turned into a nightmare. Boy, he's got a special place in heaven. On a nicer note, Thanks so much for this site

SuperUser Account:

No Idea. It's hard to follow up on these guys as the workload is very heavy. We expose them and move on.

william frank grist:

Great site I am glad to see it in operation. William Frank Grist SF

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